Robert E. Lee Cabin

Robert E. Lee Cabin Amenities

  • Queen bed downstairs in private bedroom
  • Queen bed upstairs in loft
  • Single bed in private bedroom downstairs
  • Pull out sofa bed
  • Bathroom with shower
  • Private out door hot tub
  • Full Kitchen
  • Electric Stove
  • Refrigerator
  • Microwave
  • Coffee Maker
  • Toaster
  • Dishwasher
  • Apartment size washer and dryer
  • Basic Dish package & DVD player
  • Gas Fireplace and Electric Heat
  • Propane Grill
  • All linens, Towels, & Kitchen Utensils supplied
  • We do suggest bringing beach towels for the hot tub
  • AT&T cell service only in this area. If you have AT&T you will have service at the Cabin.

History of the Robert E. Lee Cabin

  • The Robert E. Lee Cabin was named after Robert Edward Lee
  • Born January 19, 1807 – Died October 12, 1870

image1-3 Robert E. Lee Cabin West Virginia CabinsLee was an American soldier known for commanding the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia in the American Civil War from 1862 until his surrender in 1865. He served throughout the United States, distinguished himself during the Mexican–American War, served as Superintendent of the United States Military Academy.

When Virginia declared its secession from the Union in April 1861, Lee chose to follow his home state, despite his personal desire for the country to remain intact and despite an offer of a senior Union command. During the first year of the Civil War, Lee served as a senior military adviser to President Jefferson Davis. Once he took command of the main field army in 1862 he soon emerged as a shrewd tactician and battlefield commander, winning most of his battles, all against far superior Union armies. Lee’s strategic foresight was more questionable, and both of his major offensives into Union territory ended in defeat. Lee’s aggressive tactics, which resulted in high casualties at a time when the Confederacy had a shortage of manpower, have come under criticism in recent years. Union General Ulysses S. Grant’s campaigns (particularly the Vicksburg Campaign) crippled the Confederacy in 1864 and 1865, and Lee was unable to turn the war’s tide or stop Grant’s advance during the Overland Campaign and Richmond–Petersburg Campaign. After being thoroughly outmaneuvered, Lee surrendered his entire army to Grant at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865. By this time, Lee had assumed supreme command of the remaining Southern armies; other Confederate forces swiftly capitulated after his surrender. Lee rejected the proposal of a sustained insurgency against the Union and called for reconciliation between the two sides.

pocohontas county offers something for every season

Whether you’re a snow bunny or a summer child, our beautiful and historic county is the perfect place for your next vacation or weekend getaway!

Area Attractions